Posted by: Barbara Evanhoe | January 17, 2012

Simple Food, Easy Homemade

I will never become famous for my gourmet cooking….I am more of a simple, cook-by-the-seat-of-your-pants kind of girl.

But, I must admit that I rarely disappoint myself, and both Keith and I stay well-fed.

This morning we decided that it was time to do a little cooking….a half cabbage and full head of cauliflower had been lolling around the fridge for long enough, and there was some cooked chicken we needed to use as well.

So, we grabbed the soup pot, added chicken broth, the chicken, cabbage, cauliflower, tomatoes, a sweet potato and green beans, along with bay leaves, oregano, basil and garlic ~ topped the pot off with a lid and let it simmer away.

Chicken Vegetable Soup

Of course, we needed some biscuits to go along with the soup, so Keith whipped up a batch while I made cranberry scones…..

Keith's Biscuits

Our sweet tooth needs a daily dose of something that at least resembles a dessert, and these scones seem to do the trick. They are an adaptation of a recipe that appeared in my sister, Tricia’s, self published cookbook titled “Low Carb Cafe”.

The low carb count is the result of substituting white flour with soy and oat flours, and wheat germ. The original recipe calls for the use of  Splenda, but as there is a minimal amount of sweetener needed, I used sugar.

Cranberry Scones

I do plan to try it with Agave Nectar the next time I have some….all in a continuing pursuit to create a sweet treat that is not too much of a detriment to one’s health!

With the scones in the oven and the soup bubbling away, I pulled the food processor out of its hiding place and selected a can of garbanzo beans to use as the base for some hummus.

We used to buy little tubs of hummus at the grocery store for $3-$4 a tub, but decided a year or so ago that it was a silly thing to do when hummus is so easy to make…plus, we can make it exactly how we like it, which does change from time to time, according to our tastes and what we have on hand.

Today I whipped up the garbanzos with olive oil, roasted red peppers, turmeric, curry, cumin and a little water (as garbanzos are not the creamiest of beans). I do not add the traditional tahini to my hummus – I never acquired a taste for it and it’s pretty pricey too.

When the oven was free, Keith got out the scissors to cut up a stack of tortillas for baked tortilla chips. We gave up buying chips a while back, and have opted for fresh home-baked chips. They are super easy to make – just spread a layer on a baking sheet and cook until crispy.

Homemade Hummus and Tortilla Chips

I admit that we generally use white flour tortillas which are not the most healthy food that we eat, but it gives us a (perhaps false) sense that we are eating something “good” for us because we baked them ourselves!

Our cooking activities left us with half a head of cauliflower, so I popped it in the steamer and then sauteed it with a curry/butter sauce, for use as a side dish in the next day or so….however, there wasn’t much left after we sampled and sampled it…..I just can’t get enough of that curry flavor.

Curry Cauliflower

Once the cooking (and feeding) frenzy was over, we decided to go out for a walk. It was a bit windy, but otherwise, a lovely day to ramble around the streets of T or C, until time for our 3 p.m. shift at the hot springs.

It’s almost 10 p.m., and our shift is almost over…….once we lock the door, we’ll head back to our home across the street and enjoy a cup of tea and fresh cranberry scone before climbing into bed for a long winter’s rest.

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Responses

  1. Sorry to burst your bubble about Agave Nectar, but the “nectar” label is a marketing ploy to deceive you into thinking it’s a natural sweetener. In actuality, it’s made using a similar process to High Fructose Corn Syrup, and there’s nothing natural about it. HFCS and Agave Nectar are both digested in your liver, not your intestines, where it’s converted to triglycerides or stored as body fat. Check this out, it’s a good article: http://www.foodrenegade.com/agave-nectar-good-or-bad/

    • Oh wow! Thanks so much for setting me straight on this. Guess I won’t be trying the agave after all 🙂

  2. We’re trying to do more of our own cooking and eat healthiier also (including cutting down on sugar). I’ve read that Splenda is not a good choice for a sweetener also. Stevia is the best. Could you post the scone recipe?

    • I’d be happy to dig out the recipe in the next few days and post it!


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